Design of steel portal frame buildings to Eurocode 3

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This page is about the following publication:

  • Design of steel portal frame buildings to Eurocode 3
  • Authors:
    • J R Henderson
  • ISBN: 13: 978-1-85942-214-4
  • Year: 2015

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SUMMARY

Steel portal frames are the most common form of single-storey construction in the UK, usually designed using bespoke software. Whereas the design of portal frames was well-covered in BS 5950-1, the guidance in BS EN 1993-1-1 is less detailed and not UK-specific. This publication extends the guidance presented in publications P397 and P400. It deals with portal frames with more than one bay, 'hit and miss' frames, plastic analysis and design as well as elastic. It deals with issues which are not covered by BS EN 1993-1-1 on elastic checks on haunches and gives guidance on the effects of initial imperfections based on research carried out over the last two years.

P397 remains useful as it contains worked examples not retained in the present publication. The in-plane buckling checks of column and rafter considered individually, presented in P397 are superseded by in-plane verification of the frame considered as a whole.

CONTENTS

FOREWORD

SUMMARY

1 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Scope
1.2 Why choose a portal frame?

2 SOME FEATURES OF PORTAL FRAME BUILDINGS

2.1 General
2.2 Hit and miss frames
2.3 Cranes

3 DESIGN PROCESS

4 ACTIONS

4.1 Permanent actions
4.2 Variable actions
4.3 Thermal actions
4.4 Crane loads
4.5 Accidental actions
4.6 Equivalent horizontal forces
4.7 Combinations of actions

5 ELASTIC AND PLASTIC ANALYSIS

5.1 Elastic and plastic theory
5.2 First and second order analysis
5.3 Elastic frame analysis
5.4 Plastic frame analysis

6 INITIAL DESIGN

6.1 Building layout
6.2 Preliminary analysis

7 FRAME ANALYSIS

7.1 Introduction
7.2 Frame imperfections
7.3 Inclusion of second order effects
7.4 Base stiffness
7.5 Evaluation of in-plane frame stability
7.6 Evaluation of in-plane stability when the axial force in the rafter is significant
7.7 Modified first order elastic analysis
7.8 Modified first order plastic analysis
7.9 Hit and miss frames
7.10 Overall stability perpendicular to the portal frames

8 MEMBER VERIFICATION

8.1 Cross-sectional resistance
8.2 Member buckling resistance
8.3 Column stability
8.4 Rafter stability

9 BRACING

9.1 Vertical bracing
9.2 Roof bracing
9.3 Restraint to inner flanges

10 GABLES

10.1 Types of gable frame
10.2 Gable columns

11 CONNECTIONS

11.1 Eaves connections
11.2 Apex connections
11.3 Bases, base plates and foundations

12 SERVICEABILITY ASPECTS OF FRAME DESIGN

12.1 Deflections
12.2 Thermal expansion

REFERENCES

CREDITS

APPENDIX A - PRELIMINARY SIZING

APPENDIX B - DETERMINATION OF THE ELASTIC CRITICAL FORCE AND MOMENT

APPENDIX C - DESIGN OF MEMBERS WITH DISCRETE RESTRAINTS TO THE TENSION FLANGE

APPENDIX D - ELASTIC CRITICAL BUCKLING DERIVATION

APPENDIX E - MEMBER IMPERFECTIONS

APPENDIX F - WORKED EXAMPLES: COLUMN, RAFTER AND HAUNCH CHECKS